/Maynard Dixon Clouds of Hopi Land
Maynard Dixon Clouds of Hopi Land
Maynard Dixon Arizona
Maynard Dixon Arizona
Maynard Dixon Arizona
Maynard Dixon's mentor, Charles Lummis, encouraged Maynard Dixon early in his painting career to leave California, and "travel East to see the real West". Dixon did just that, traveling the many roads that crisscrossed the West: Montana, Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and New Mexico. Lasting weeks, to even months, these trips provided Dixon with the inspiration to create. Out of all those western lands Dixon visited, Arizona was the place he called home. He was forever drawn to the vistas and peoples inhabiting this rugged terrain.
When Maynard Dixon first visited Arizona, at the turn of the century, it was wild, open territory, inhabited primarily by Hispanics and Native Americans. In 1902, he made his first visit to Lorenzo Hubbell's Ganado trading post, and came away with wonderful sketches he would use as inspiration for many years to come. Viewing these works, one can imagine the awe Dixon felt in the raw beauty of the landscape and its inhabitants. He would return to Arizona many times, ultimately making Tucson his final home.
The Arizona paintings represent the entire gamut of painting styles Dixon utilized during his productive career. Heavy impasto and bold colors typical of his work in the teens are seen in Navajo Riders, Sky and Sandstone, and Indian Camp with Horses. Many of these canvases depict real places and people that Dixon experienced between 1914, and 1916.
By the twenties, Dixon's painting and drawing style was more post-Impressionistic. Surrounded by the landscape and people of Southern Arizona in the final years of his life, Dixon created works with a sparing use of paint and subdued color schema, as seen in Empty Afternoon and Arizona Autumn. These paintings utilized Dixon's powerful command of light and shadow are often considered quintessential. Fast Moving Shadows, Chollas Against Mountain , and Cloud Banks and Shadow are excellent examples of his masterful painting style.
The people Dixon depicted in his paintings reflect the cultural mix of the American West of the early 20th century. Dixon was delighted to live among all the peoples of the region, and his portrayals of the Hispanic, Native American, and Anglo inhabitants are without comparison. Dixon also portrayed people and their intimate interactions with the land around them, as Dixon respected the Hopi and their culture, and spent many months living with them. Maynard Dixon died in Tucson Arizona in 1946. Before his death in 1937, Edith Hamlin married Maynard Dixon. Together, Maynard Dixon and Edith Hamlin painted western scenes in Arizona and Utah. Maynard Dixon’s poetry, letters, illustrations, paintings and drawings can be seen in the Maynard Dixon Museum,Tucson, Arizona.

To learn more about Maynard Dixon visit Maynarddixon.org

Maynard Dixon Collectors should visit Medicine Man Gallery.com

Additional Art Links:

ArtUFind.com

ArtUTrade.com

MedicineManGallery.com

SantaFeArtGalleries.net

CanyonRoadArts.com

TaosArtGalleries.net

AlbuquerqueArtGalleries.net

Maynard Dixon Hubbell Trading Post
Maynard Dixon Navajo Riders
Maynard Dixon Hubbell Trading Post
Maynard Dixon Navajo Riders
Maynard Dixon Sky And Sandstone
Maynard Dixon Indian Camp Horses
Maynard Dixon Sky And Sandstone
Maynard Dixon Indian Camp Horses
Maynard Dixon Empty Afternoon
Fast Moving Shadows
Maynard Dixon Empty Afternoon
Maynard Dixon Fast Moving Shadows
Maynard Dixon Chollas Against Mountain
Maynard Dixon Saguaro
Maynard Dixon Chollas Against Mountain
Maynard Dixon Saguaro
Maynard Dixon Arizona Autumn
Maynard Dixon Arizona Autumn
Maynard Dixon Ranch Hand Reading Letter
Maynard Dixon Ranch Hand Reading Letter
Maynard Dixon Hopi Matron
Maynard Dixon Hopi Matron